Attention Grabbers (Keep students’ attention…even in May!)

by Bobbie Brownell

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Almost every teacher, whether they went to Yale or got their teaching degree online, thinks about using a big attention grabber to start class…especially in these final weeks of the school year when spring fever is rampant. Attention grabbers can range from a simple question to an elaborate demonstration. Either way, the message is clear: Wake up! Time to learn!

When to use an attention grabber:

  • Quiet a noisy room
  • Introduce a new topic
  • Motivate students
  • Demonstrate a theory or natural occurrence
  • Ward off summeritis

Have fun getting their attention, just be careful that the attention grabber does not take away from the overall meaning of the lesson. Try to keep their focus on the learning objectives. This benefits everyone in class and helps by taking away unnecessary distractions. We all know how easy it is to get the students’ minds off of the material. Daniel Willingham’s explanation on why students remember or forget material learned in class is linked to what the students are thinking about while new material is being introduced.

Questions to consider before using an attention grabber:

• Is the attention grabber relevant to the lesson?

• Could this be done in the middle of the lesson if students start to zone out?

• Will students be engaged and motivated to learn afterward?

• Will this continue to distract the students after the demonstration is over?

Tips to motivate:

• Timing is key – Try using relevant attention grabbers in the middle of the lesson. Students tend to mentally check out around the half-way point of class. This is a great time to reel them back in with something stimulating like a thought-provoking or a controversial question for them to discuss or write about.

• Give choices – If motivation is lacking, give the students a chance to have some input in what they are learning. Giving choices on what to read or research can be a huge motivator because it allows students to learn about something they are interested in. Have students come up with their own writing prompts; you’ll be surprised by all the brilliant ideas!

• Ask questions – Ask the students thought provoking questions to start a class discussion. Discussion is an invaluable tool since it invites the entire class to become involved with the lesson and with each other. Try something like, “Is murder ever justified?” or “What do you think would be different if this classroom was in Paris?” Use anything to get them thinking and talking.

• Relate concepts to the real world – Teachers sometimes forget that the best way to learn something is the simplest way. Ask yourself, “How did I learn this?” and “How does what we’re learning relate to the outside world?” Real-world examples work because students can relate to them. At any age, we learn by making connections from things we know to new ideas and experiences. Using examples that can be found or repeated at home can help deepen the understanding between the concept and the individual student.

Transitioning into new subjects is difficult for both teachers and students. Make it fun and be creative! Paying attention to transitions will make the change easier for everyone involved. Tricky Transitions…Made Easier! is a great example of thinking about transitions and how they can be used in a younger classroom environment.

Bobbie Brownell holds a bachelors degree in English and is currently in the NC Teach program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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3 Comments

Filed under Activities, Behavior Management, Critical Thinking, Discipline, Motivation

3 responses to “Attention Grabbers (Keep students’ attention…even in May!)

  1. Jennifer Nuss

    I always worry about the end of the year and keeping my students busy. We are taking a virtual field trip. I have also have my attention grabbers be physical, i.e. clapping, stomping, etc. Anytime a kid is physical in their learning it lasts longer.

  2. Tonya Cater

    As a home schooling mother, I know very well just how hard it can be to keep my child’s attention. I like to prerecord me reading the lesson adding in real world examples and questions. I simple stop the tape after the question.We all remember the days when our teacher reading the lesson would suddenly turn into Charle Brown’s teacher ..wa. wa. waa. wwaa. and we would just zone out. By prerecording it my eyes are on her and I can see if she is paying attention. I also make sure to have either some kind of physical hands on activity or game that goes with every lesson. This helps to make the lesson come alive and actual keep the information in her head.

  3. Connie

    Great article. Attention grabbers are something we should think about all year. I like to use movement activities as attention getters. I have to move around and of course third graders do too!